Paul Myoda: Glittering Machines

April 8, 2011 - June 4, 2011

Opening reception April 8, 2011, 6 p.m. - 9 p.m.

Dorsch Gallery is pleased to present a solo exhibition called Glittering Machines of works by Providence-based sculptor Paul Myoda. The exhibition will consist of eight crystalline machines, whose lights and sounds are activated by movement. The opening reception for the artist will be Friday, April 8th, 6-9pm. The gallery will also be open noon-9pm on Saturday, April 9th, for Wynwood Second Saturday. The artist will be at the events on April 8th and 9th. The exhibition will be on view through May 7, 2011.

Since 2008, Myoda has been working on cybernetic sculptures, which are dynamic, interactive works of art that investigate and borrow from various biological systems (i.e., communicational, behavioral, and environmental). In an age where the screen mediates every single one of our computing experiences, the field of cybernetic sculpture is in a break-out moment. Myoda states the basis for this claim: "The graphic user interfaces that allow us to interact with our computers and other electronic devices are beginning to feel too narrow, too constricting, too separating, too disembodied."

Behind Myoda's multi-faceted sculptural project is the passionate conviction that exploring different ways for computation to exist and interact physically in our world will combat this century's version of alienation. His work does this beautifully and with an engineer's attention to intricate detail and functional potential. One of Myoda's new machines Billowy Sconce (2010) looks like a cross between an intricately designed three-dimensional snowflake and a sea anemone, rendered with clear plastic and metal parts. Once activated, sensing a moving presence in the room, it shines light in multiple directions, creating a prismatic sculpture of angular crystalline forms, whose material is light. Another sculpture, Ratchet (2010), its graphic clover-like shape rendered in metal razor-sharp points, is utterly threatening. Attraction and intimidation are both survival mechanisms.

Sculptor Paul Myoda had a studio in the World Trade Center I in 2001, so he is attuned to the movement from trauma to utter disconnectedness, a feeling enhanced by living in a city where, especially right after September 11th, one avoids looking up, much less beyond one's next step. Subsequent works encouraged citizens to look up again. In 2002, in memory of the tragic events of that day, he co-created a prism of searchlights for the WTC site. Tribute in Light is now an annual installation. In 2006 he proposed a synthetic star with Julian Laverdiere called Urban Lodestar, which was published in Popular Science, to give urbanites back what they cannot see: starlight.

By encouraging us to look, engage and respond, his works articulate nuances of our own ways of being in this world.

Paul Myoda received his BFA from Rhode Island School of Design in 1989 and his MFA from Yale University in 1994. He lists more than 40 exhibitions of sculptures, drawings and installations. He has also written for various art publications, including Art in America, Flash Art, and Frieze. From 1994-2006, he lived in New York, NY, co-founding an art production company, Big Room, and an architecture-ideas collaboration, Myoda + Ruy-Klein Architecture, and serving as an Adjunct Professor at The City College of New York. He has received grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, The National Science Foundation, Warhol Foundation, and Howard Foundation, among others. In 2001, he participated in the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council's World Views Program and had a studio on the 91st floor of WTC I. In March of 2002 he co-created the Tribute in Light in memory of the tragic events of 9/11, which has subsequently become an annual installation. Since 2006 he has been based in Rhode Island, where he is an Assistant Professor in the Visual Art Department at Brown University, teaching sculpture and new media. This is his first exhibition at Dorsch Gallery.

Paul Myoda

Installation view (project room), from left:

Glittering Machine: Billowy-Thorny Sconce, 2010, Aluminum, thermoplastic, LEDs, microprocessor, circuit w/ ultrasonic sensor, 30" x 12" x 20", Edition of 1, 1 AP

Glittering Machine: Chandelier, 2011, Aluminum, thermoplastic, LEDs, microprocessor, circuit w/ ultrasonic sensor, 18" x 34" x 34", Edition of 1, 1 AP

Glittering Machine: Billowy Sconce, 2010, Aluminum, thermoplastic, LEDs, microprocessor, circuit w/ ultrasonic sensor, 12" x 12" x 14", Edition of 1, 1 AP

Paul Myoda

Glittering Machine: Billowy-Thorny Sconce, 2010, Aluminum, thermoplastic, LEDs, microprocessor, circuit w/ ultrasonic sensor, 30" x 12" x 20", Edition of 1, 1 AP

Paul Myoda

Glittering Machine: Billowy Sconce, 2010, Aluminum, thermoplastic, LEDs, microprocessor, circuit w/ ultrasonic sensor, 12" x 12" x 14", Edition of 1, 1 AP

Paul Myoda

Glittering Machine: Ratchet #1, 2010, Aluminum, thermoplastic, LEDs, motor, microprocessor, circuit w/ ultrasonic sensor, 14" x 10" x 14", Edition of 1, 1 AP

Paul Myoda

Glittering Machine: Bell #1, 2010, Aluminum, thermoplastic, LEDs, motor, microprocessor, circuit w/ ultrasonic sensor, 14" x 12" 14", Edition of 1, 1 AP

Click on the Links below to see videos of them in action.

Glittering Machine: Billowy Sconce
Glittering Machine: Bell #1